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Bruno Lanz

Assistant professor of applied economics

Biography

Since September 2016, Bruno Lanz is an assistant professor of applied economics at the University of Neuchâtel, Switzerland. Bruno is also an associate researcher at ETH Zurich and a research affiliate of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Bruno’s research combines tools from economic analysis and empirical methods to inform concrete problems of resource management. His recent publications focus on water supply investment decisions, on the economic and environmental impacts of global population growth, and on the costs/benefits of energy and climate policy. Previously, Bruno was a research program director at IHEID, and he has also worked as an economic consultant with a London-based company, with whom he still regularly consults.

Bruno holds a PhD in Economics from ETH Zurich, and master degrees from the University of Lausanne and University College London.

Expertise

  • Applied economics
  • Environmental, energy and resource economics
  • Public economics and regulation
  • Applied econometrics
  • Numerical methods and computational economics
  • Behavioral and experimental economics

Teaching

  • Applied Econometrics
  • Empirical Methods for Economists

Selected publications

  • Lanz, B., Wurlod, J., et al. (2018). The behavioral effect of Pigovian regulation: Evidence from a field experiment. Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, 87, 190-205.
  • Lanz, B., and Provins, A. (2017). Using averting expenditures to estimate the demand for public goods: Combining objective and perceived quality. Resource and Energy Economics, 47, 20-35.
  • Lanz, B., Dietz, S., and Swanson, T. (2017). Global population growth, technology, and Malthusian constraints: A quantitative growth theoretic perspective. International Economic Review, 58 (3), 973-1006.
  • Lanz, B., and Rausch, S. (2016). Emissions trading in the presence of price-regulated polluting firms: How costly are free allowances? The Energy Journal, 37(1), 195-232.
  • Bommier, A., Lanz, B., and Zuber, S. (2015). Models-as-usual for unusual risks? On the value of catastrophic climate change. Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, 74, 1-22.