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About us

Prof. Jordi Tejel

Within the framework of this research project, I am planning to re-examine the relationship between violence, border-making and state-formation in the Middle East after the collapse of the Ottoman Empire by using ‘borderlands’ as an analytical device that affords a new, decentred perspective. Likewise, the project expects to generate new knowledge in the areas of “border studies” (border-making, frontier effects and circulations across borders) and the history of the Middle East by using both qualitative and quantitative methods.

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Dr. Ramazan Hakki Öztan

In this research project, I'm planning to examine three interrelated topics. First, I am interested in exploring how the influx of refugees in the early years of the Turkish Republic helped consolidate Turkish identity, expand state authority, and demarcate spatial borders. Second, how did the actors located in the Turkish/Syrian/Iraqi borderlands respond to the consolidation of state authority in the late 1920s and early 1930s? Finally, I hope to examine the ways in which the establishment of borders lead to the creation of illicit markets and the attempts of the state to contain them.

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Viktorya Abrahamyan

Since September 2017, I am a PhD student in the Department of History under the supervision of Prof. Jordi Tejel. The research, titled “Towards a Decentred History of the Middle East: Transborder Spaces, Circulations, Frontier Effects and State Formation, 1920-1946” (BORDER), is funded by the European Research Council. The focus of my research is to explore to what extent and how the Armenian refugees played at once a direct and indirect role in shaping the state building processes in Syria, in terms of defining national identity, expanding state authority and consolidating state’s borders during the French mandate (1920-1946).

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Prof. Jordi Tejel

Ramazan Hakki Öztan

Viktorya Abrahamyan