Fermer

Deborah Ambrosio

Research interests

Sousa plumbea is a humpback dolphin considered as a species only since 2014. Its recent separation from the species Sousa chinensis makes it a very unknown species and thus needs to be studied as we have little information about it. These dolphins have one of the most restricted area of distribution as they live less than 3km away from the coast and at a maximum depth of 25m. Their restricted distribution makes them less resilient to environmental changes and human threats which increases their extinction risk.

As an endangered species, basic research on Indian Ocean humpback dolphins is urgently required to avoid extinction, in particular concerning its habitat use and response to human activities. One recent conservation effort has been launched by a collaboration between the Swiss Cetacean Society (Lausanne, Switzerland: Eco-label) and Terra Conscious (North Goa, India: Terra conscious) to issue Eco-Labels for responsible tour operators who follow guidelines and observe satisfactory conservation standards. The current project is linked up with these ongoing activities, by providing the necessary behavioural ecological data on this little explored marine species.

The goal of my master project is to focus on the little-known Indian Ocean humpback dolphins and its reaction to dolphin-watching tour operators and the use of the local habitat. These data will be highly essential in any future conservation efforts for this species, especially towards the establishment of Marine Protected Areas along the West Indian coastline. Currently, there are no MPAs in this part of the world, despite the presence of several endangered marine species. Our research question is whether the dolphin-watching impact the natural behavior of the species and in how manner. The final objective to help the implementation of a conservation plan in India to preserve the species and minimize the impact of dolphin-watching on the study species.

Sousa plumbea is a humpback dolphin considered as a species only since 2014. Its recent separation from the species Sousa chinensis makes it a very unknown species and thus needs to be studied as we have little information about it. These dolphins have one of the most restricted area of distribution as they live less than 3km away from the coast and at a maximum depth of 25m. Their restricted distribution makes them less resilient to environmental changes and human threats which increases their extinction risk.

As an endangered species, basic research on Indian Ocean humpback dolphins is urgently required to avoid extinction, in particular concerning its habitat use and response to human activities. One recent conservation effort has been launched by a collaboration between the Swiss Cetacean Society (Lausanne, Switzerland: Eco-label) and Terra Conscious (North Goa, India: Terra conscious) to issue Eco-Labels for responsible tour operators who follow guidelines and observe satisfactory conservation standards. The current project is linked up with these ongoing activities, by providing the necessary behavioural ecological data on this little explored marine species.

The goal of my master project is to focus on the little-known Indian Ocean humpback dolphins and its reaction to dolphin-watching tour operators and the use of the local habitat. These data will be highly essential in any future conservation efforts for this species, especially towards the establishment of Marine Protected Areas along the West Indian coastline. Currently, there are no MPAs in this part of the world, despite the presence of several endangered marine species. Our research question is whether the dolphin-watching impact the natural behavior of the species and in how manner. The final objective to help the implementation of a conservation plan in India to preserve the species and minimize the impact of dolphin-watching on the study species.